The 'most likely impacts' in the current forecast for Eastern N.C. include minor to moderate storm surge and high surf, tropical storm force winds, rain and flash flooding, extremely dangerous conditions for boaters and rip currents

The forecast North Carolina residents woke up to on Wednesday was vastly different from the one they saw before going to sleep Tuesday night.

A 5 a.m. storm briefing from the National Weather Service in Newport notes a “significant model forecast change in the track of Matthew.”

The new forecast shifts the storm’s track east and indicate the storm’s center will remain off the coast of North Carolina, diminishing the threat of dangerous conditions.

However, the briefing notes, “We are hopeful this model trend continues and the most significant impacts are not realized in Eastern NC. However it is too early to completely let our guard down.”

The coast of North Carolina is, however, still within the “cone of uncertainty” with the current forecast bringing the center of the storm near the North and South Carolina border around 2 a.m. Sunday.

The “most likely impacts” in the current forecast for Eastern N.C. include minor to moderate storm surge and high surf 2 to 4 feet above normal, tropical storm force winds that could produce minor damage along the coast, 2 to 5 inches of rain and flash flooding, extremely dangerous conditions for boaters and rip currents. Tropical storm force winds, primarily along the coast, are still possible beginning late Saturday through mid to late day Sunday, according to the NWS.

The National Weather Service recommends that residents continue to monitor the forecast and have a disaster preparedness kit ready just in case.