After a series of public comment sessions in 2014, the commission is seeking additional comments on the planned use of the property the next decade, according to a release from the agency. Stones Creek is one of six game lands statewide to undergo the additional level of public review.

The state seeks comments for a land-use plan for nearly 3,000 undeveloped acres at Stones Creek Game Land.

N.C. Wildlife and Resources Commission is accepting comments until Sept. 30. Comments should be emailed with the game lands’ name as subject to GameLandPlan@NCWildlife.org.

Commission Coastal Ecoregion Supervisor Tommy Hughes said the draft game lands management plan is “not really a change” from current land uses.

“It’s an encompassing document that plans the next 10 years on that game land,” he said. “It talks about habitat conditions there, our desires for habitat in the future, and it talks about the species there, and infrastructure — mainly road systems.”

The state owns the property and works with the military and the Nature Conservancy to protect the lands from development to avoid interrupting training aboard the base, Hughes said.

“The Department of Defense (DoD) was concerned about all the developments next to Camp Lejeune and how it may affect training,” Hughes said. “That area was planned for a fairly large development there. We prevent the future development while managing the wildlife that are there.”

After a series of public comment sessions in 2014, the commission is seeking additional comments on the planned use of the property the next decade, according to a release from the agency. Stones Creek is one of six game lands statewide to undergo the additional level of public review.

Drafts of the land-management plans are available at NCWildlife.org/GameLandPlans.

In Stones Creek, a DoD easement was granted in 2005, according to federal documents.

“Whereas, (North Carolina) intends to limit development of the property and preserve and protect the conservation values of the property in perpetuity,” according to the easement. “Whereas, it is in the public interest to limit development or use of property in the vicinity of the installation that would otherwise be incompatible with its mission and to preserve habitat on such property in a manner that is compatible with environmental requirements that would or might interfere … with the current or anticipated military training, testing or operations.”

A public-comment process already tapped desired uses of the property. The draft management plan includes uses claimed popular by citizens.

“I use the Stones Creek Game Land for big/small game hunting, fishing, and shed hunting/hiking,” according to one comment in the draft.

“We use the land for hunting dove, but would like to use it for geocaching, bird watching and photography, but it is not safe for such use due to a lack of law enforcement presence,” another citizen wrote.

Others believed the property should be limited to hunting.

“I still hunt this game land and (I) think this game land should be for Still Hunting ONLY. It’s a small piece of land and running dogs is not good for the deer. I wish there was turkey on the land,” read a comment from that perspective.

The property’s plan recognizes the presence of wild turkeys and white-tailed deer.

Hughes said the property is popular among hunters.“It’s game land. It’s hunted. There’s deer hunting, quail hunting, a little duck hunting in one of the beaver ponds and we see some rabbit hunting,” he said. “Anybody out there hunting needs to review our digest before they go to make sure they’re in compliance.”

For more information, visit NCWildlife.org.